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REVIEW: Idaho Shakespeare Festival's ‘Romeo and Juliet’ smells as sweet

June 4th, 2012

Published: June 4, 2012

ISF opens with an energetic, fresh take on an old favorite.

BY DANA OLAND doland@idahostatesman.com © 2012 Idaho Statesman

“Romeo and Juliet” is a tough play to produce, simply because everyone knows how it ends.

The payoff, then, is the journey: the progression from innocent all-consuming love — the kind you’re willing to die for — to the real the cost of that love.

Charlie Fee, the Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s producing artistic director, has deftly made The Bard’s greatest love story about that journey.


Photo by DKM Photography

The play’s hurdles, hubris, human failing and missteps are a reminder that love is a powerful drug.

“Romeo and Juliet” opened the Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s 36th season Saturday. The production marks an energetic start to the season with ribald comedy, dynamic fight scenes by fight choreographer Ken Merckx and heart-rending tragedy.

Saturday also marked the 20th anniversary season of the Fool Squad’s Greenshow, a comical prelude that has become a festival signature.

Fee sets his “R & J” in 1920s Verona. Set designer Gage Williams has crafted a beautiful bombed-out city that serves as a physical metaphor.

As the night progresses, Rick Martin’s rich lighting in cool blues and hot amber brings the set to life. Likewise, Peter John Still’s sound design surrounds the amphitheater with bird calls and foreshadowing.

Star Moxley’s luscious and elegant costuming embraces a palette of soft grays and rich purples that binds the show together. As always with Moxley’s clothing, there are things everyone must have: Juliet’s flowing party dress and Mercutio’s military long coat.

Fee installs an act break just as Romeo and Juliet, played by Christian Durso and Betsy Mugavero, run off to marry.

That break divides the play’s comedy from tragedy and further emphasizes the turn from happy promise to dust and destruction.

Many of ISF’s mature company members play the adults: Aled Davies and elegant Laura Perrotta as the Capulets, Stitch Marker and Lynn Allison as the Montegues. David Anthony Smith is the Prince, Lynn Robert Berg is Friar Laurence and M.A. Taylor is comic servant Peter.

Mugavero is a delightful Juliet, able to reach teenage joy and passion along with great depth of feeling.

Durso brims with frustration of young love that allows him only to spout poetry until Juliet undoes him. They have a lovely chemistry.

J. Todd Adams is marvelous as Mercutio, Romeo’s testosterone- and wine-fueled friend. Laurie Brimingham is wonderfully motherly as Juliet’s Nurse. Perrotta is a cool contrast as Juliet’s mother. Dana Oland: 377-6442

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Click to read more at Idaho Statesman

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Pop Quiz with Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s Charlie Fee and Mark Hofflund

May 21st, 2012

By DANA OLAND — doland@idahostatesman.com

Posted: 12:00am on May 18, 2012
Luck and pluck brought Charlie Fee to the Idaho Shakespeare Festival as artistic director in 1992. The board chose the tall charmer from California from a field of about 100 candidates — despite the fact that at the time he had never directed a play by William Shakespeare.

After a solid first season, Fee hired his longtime friend and colleague Mark Hofflund — who had never been a managing director — as his stalwart second in command, and the die was cast. These two first-timers set out to create theater in Boise.

“At the time, I told Mark, ‘Who knows what this will be? It could be one year or five.’ But I knew we wanted to build a theater, and I thought we could do it,” Fee says.

This season marks their 20th anniversary together at the helm. In that time, they have achieved what they set out to do and more.

With Fee’s charisma and creativity and Hofflund’s intellect and attention to detail, they make a formidable team.

They met in the theater graduate program at the University of California, San Diego. They share a vision and creative ethic that strike a balance between savvy business acumen and creative flair.

In 1998, they opened ISF’s multimillion-dollar amphitheater for summer production. They’ve created a strong artistic company that brings artists back year after year to create theater against the backdrop of the Boise Foothills. They acquired Idaho Theater for Youth and developed the theater’s Shakespearience education programs and have a direct impact on kids from elementary to high school age across the state.

But perhaps most importantly, they have changed the model for how a regional theater can operate by forging unique partnerships with Great Lakes Theater in Cleveland 10 years ago and Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival three years ago.

Fee also is the producing artistic director at those theaters, and he moves productions and casts from city to city. That makes ISF the only regional summer repertory company in the country producing work in three states.

How did you choose Mark as your managing director?
CHARLIE: Mark and Lynn (Allison Hofflund) came through on a vacation that first summer. We had dinner and when they left, Lidia (Fee’s wife) said, ‘You’re looking for a managing director. Why not Mark?’ I was like, ‘You’re absolutely right. Done.’ We made the call the next day.
It took a little bit of pushing Mark to take this kind of risk. The truth is, we were both at a point in our careers that if we weren’t going to do it at that age, we weren’t ever going to.
MARK: Lynn and I were driving through the desert on our way back to San Diego, when Lynn asked me the same question. ‘Did Charlie ask you about a job?’ But I wasn’t really looking for a job. (Mark was literary manager at The Old Globe theater.) When I got the call, I wasn’t sure. I asked one of my mentors at The Old Globe, (managing director) Tom Hall, for advice. He said, ‘If you like and want to work with Charlie, you should do this because the two of you will come up with a model that we don’t know yet,’ not knowing what he meant.

What makes you two good partners?
CHARLIE: I trust Mark. He’s from the same theatrical tradition. I knew he’d be strong in community relations, just from knowing him. He would be a good fundraising team for me and for our board of directors. And after being at the Globe for 10 years, he has that deep institutional programming, which we needed here because we wanted to create a more institutional theater company.
MARK: I’ve always had a high regard for Charlie and Lidia. On a fundamental level, Charlie’s someone who has been among my peers and also among my mentors. I had some good mentors at the Globe.

How did you start creating your company?
CHARLIE: I wrote a five-year plan that first summer that included building the amphitheater. First, I deeply believe in a company structure. I grew up around ACT (American Conservatory Theater) in San Francisco, a large repertory theater, sustaining artists over many years. I knew we would bring together people we wanted to work with to develop a body of work. We would define and create our aesthetic as a team. We were looking for people who would make multiyear commitments.
I looked for emerging artists who had just left grad school or were in their first professional blush. It’s this period where you lose a huge number of talented people because they can’t get work and they think they have to be in the big city. I’d go to them and say, ‘OK, fine, but in the meantime come and do this and work on developing a company with us.’
MARK: Charlie had an incredible vision that I didn’t fully appreciate at the time. It was a little against the way theater was going. Then it was moving away from the repertory idea, but in Boise that’s what made sense. And then, it was just the two of us in the office most days. We got to invent how we were going do this.

So who came on board then?
CHARLIE: Bart was the first director I hired, who we knew from San Diego. (Bartlett Sher directed at ISF from 1992 to 1999. He has gone on to direct at the Lincoln Center Theatre and the Metropolitan Opera. Sher won the 2008 Tony for Best Direction of a Musical for “South Pacific.”) We also brought in costume designer Kim Krumm Sorensen and Peter John Still (resident sound designer). By the second summer, we had Mark, Gage Williams (resident set designer), Rick Martin (resident lighting designer). The same thing with actors — a lot of people who come back year after year.

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Is that still how you’re building?
CHARLIE: We’re older now, so we’re hiring people who are older and who come from deeper backgrounds. The acting company is still being found in the same way. We’re bringing a lot of new young talent in this season, people I’ve not worked with before. There are new designers, a new composer, a new director (Jesse Berger of Red Bull Theatre in New York City will direct “The Winter’s Tale.”) The company is growing faster than ever now because of this new model. With three theaters, there are literally more roles to fill.

What’s next?
CHARLIE: There are lots of nexts. You know us, we don’t just set out in one direction. We have a bunch of ideas that are percolating all the time, waiting for the opportunity. The next could be a fourth theater — but it’s not the thing I’m focused on. When Tahoe happened, we had been focused on finding a third theater. Right now we have to solidify and expand Tahoe’s season (two plays for next season). It’s really becoming clear that there are other ways to move our work to other cities that don’t have to do with having another full-on company.

Touring?
CHARLIE: Yes. We could do “Mousetrap” and “Winter’s Tale” (the two shows originated in Boise) in Cleveland, then take them to Columbus (Ohio), for instance. Then bring the focus back to Boise. The whole point is to keep the company working.

In all of history, with whom would you most like to dine?
CHARLIE: Benjamin Franklin. It would be fun. He just knew everything.
MARK: Lynne Rossetto Kasper. (Host of American Public Media’s “The Splendid Table.”)

What are you reading?
CHARLIE: I read magazines. The Atlantic, which I just love, and it’s my favorite reading on planes. I am a podcast addict. My top podcasts: The BBC “In Our Own Time with Melvyn Bragg” — it’s history and philosophy and it’s the best podcast on Earth; “Start the Week with Andrew Marr,” also BBC; Slate Magazine “Culture Gabfest” and “Political Gabfest” and “This American Life”
MARK: “The Years with Ross” by James Thurber. (Originally published in 1958, it’s available from Perennial Classics, paperback edition, $14.99). It’s a biography of The New Yorker founder Harold Ross. He’s a guy who came out of the American heartland and started a thing that failed. Then he started it again until it was successful. I was at an arts meeting and a friend was telling me I needed to read this book. He literally found a copy on a decorative bookshelf in the hotel lobby, and they gave it to me.

What’s on your playlist?
CHARLIE: I get addicted to a single thing, and I listen to it for several weeks. Right now I’m addicted to Mumford and Sons and the soundtrack to “Pina.” That’s our party music now. I loved the movie, but the music is just great.
MARK: I don’t really listen to music although I’m surrounded by it; I grew up with it and love it. I don’t have an iPod. If I can unplug, I go out for a run, and I listen to the music in my head.

What keeps you in Boise?
CHARLIE: The most obvious things — friends, the lifestyle. I love to mountain bike in the Foothills. When I’m in Cleveland, I pine for them. Boise is a really great place to live because it’s not filled with the daily indignities you have to suffer in most cities, where it takes so much energy to do anything, like go grocery shopping. And, of course, our work.
MARK: I agree. It’s that combination of quality of life, quality of the people and the opportunities, for both me and Lynn. She’s been able to carve out a very creative life for herself here as an actor and director. The opportunities here are stunning, and they’re ones we wouldn’t get as readily someplace else. Boise is a place where you have the ability to accomplish things that benefit other people in schools, in politics, in so many walks of life.

What’s your guilty pleasure?
CHARLIE: I have too many is the problem, and I don’t want to talk about the ones I really have. I know — crime novels. I love Henning Mankell. He’s one of the Swedish guys. He’s got this character Kurt Wallander who’s really human and wonderful. I can’t wait for the next book.
MARK: Running in the dark.

Whom do you most admire?
CHARLIE: Nick Hytner, artistic director of the National Theatre in London, for transforming a huge company and creating thrilling work.
MARK: Everyone who has ever tried to teach me something.

What is your motto?
CHARLIE: Feature what you can’t fix.
MARK: Love what you do.

Click to read more at Idaho Statesman

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“And then is heard no more”

April 13th, 2012

When someone asks me what I do for a living and I say “I perform abridged Shakespeare plays in rural high school gymnasiums across the state of Idaho at 8 o’clock in the morning in the middle of winter.” It sounds less glamorous than it feels. It feels… important, and I truly believe it is. I know that an old school wooden gym in Hanson and the pulpit of a converted church in Sandpoint might not be the stage of the RSC… but I treat it as if it were. I think everyone in our cast and crew shares the same belief or feeling, which is one of the reasons we all work together so well and why I love this job so much.

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Who knows, performing in a gymnasium may actually be the greater challenge. First off, you are in a gym. It is 8 AM You are performing Shakespeare for high school students and not all of them are convinced that they want to be there. It might be better than being in class for some, but maybe not much better. The best thing I will say for playing gyms is that you never step out of your light and by the third week of tour, you will know if you are supporting your voice properly. If not, that’s about the time it disappears.
And yet… places get taken, music starts and this amazing thing happens. I don’t see the walls of the gym for another 48 minutes. If we do our job then “neither time nor place” holds the audience down either and they go on the journey beyond the gym walls with us. Happy to say that most of them, most of the time, do…and that’s sayin’ somethin’!
Every year of tour is more incredible than the last and I am continually grateful for the experience.  I learn so much each year about acting, teaching, Shakespeare and myself. Partly, because we have the opportunity to perform a single show 70 to 90 times. Even though we perform a cut down version of the script, Shakespeare’s poetry is so layered, it constantly yields new discoveries and insights. In fact it’s usually performance number 56 when you say a three-word line and suddenly, like a bucket of water in the face, you are hit with the true meaning of what you are saying in those simple three words. Moving from knowledge to wisdom through experience.
This year in particular has been special for me because it is the fourth year in a row I have done Shakesperience. It has been incredible getting to know the theater and literature teaching professionals across the state and the soon to be professionals they teach. I can say with pride that there are some amazing teachers and educators across this state and they are doing great work with the future of tomorrow. We have also gotten to know many wonderful administrators and janitors in the process, as well as the importance of protecting the shine on basketball gym floors. (We only leave boot scuffmarks, I swear.)
Some of the students I have gotten to know over the performances and workshops are graduating this year. I was able to talk with a lot of them that I have had the privilege of performing for and teaching each year they were in high school.  It has been incredible to see them grow as artists and people over the years.  It’s not only in the choices they make in the workshops but they way they talk about theater and Shakespeare and the growing confidence in themselves and their abilities.  I know I learn so much about theater each year from the tour and from them; I hope the students see this progression in my work and might learn what I have learned, maybe sooner than I did.
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My greatest hope in these performances is to share with students the passion I have in the belief that theater (and the plays of William Shakespeare in particular) truly help us to better understand ourselves and each other and how important that is. I believe this program creates that kind of theater because I have been fortunate enough to experience it first hand. I am so grateful for the students, teachers, schools, Idaho Shakespeare Festival, the NEA and all our wonderful sponsors, Penske, rural Idaho diner’s with chicken fried steak, my tour mates, the director and design crew, the ISF office, and all the incredible people of this beautiful state that have shared your hospitality, directions and recommendations with us for the last 11 weeks.
This year I also developed a healthy respect for the curse of the Scottish play when I broke off the top of my finger in the middle of the show two weeks before the end of tour. I won’t bore you or gore you with details but I will say this. Adrenaline is the best numbing agent on the planet. Dr. Jeremy Frix and his staff must have all attended Hogwarts because they are magicians in their field as well as some of the nicest people you’ll meet. Thank you for understanding the show must go on and making it possible for me to help it do so.  Sword fights with a broken finger aren’t easy but they're not impossible. Thanks for that.
I have to give a quick shout out to the office and our tour management team for an amazing performance in coordinating 5 actors, two vehicles, 6,800 miles of road and uncountable performances and hotels. You rock!!!!!
Oh, and episode 2 of the Macbeth tour will be up soon.
until then…
Luke
(The artist formerly known as Macbeth)
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Out, Out , Brief Candle

April 9th, 2012


The end of tour is always bittersweet. On one hand you’re saying goodbye to long hours, long drives, and way too early mornings. But on the other hand, you’re saying goodbye to the wonderful students, the most precious towns, and this show that you have lived with for 3 and a half months. This is life in the theater. Learning to say goodbye to one good thing and embrace the next. So even though, I am going to miss it, I can walk away knowing that this tour has made a difference. There were so many amazing moments that reaffirmed why I do what I do. Idaho Shakespeare Festival does such an incredible thing with this tour and I’m not just saying that because they give me a paycheck. My tour mates and I have witnessed first hand what tour does. I feel like the greatest testament to this is during almost every load out when we have one or more students come up to talk to us. They want advice and, I think, someone who they can relate to. Someone who is doing exactly what they want to do. And that is a precious thing to have, especially in high school and even more so in high school in Idaho. So I wanted to include a list of my favorite moments, in no particular order:
  • Students recognizing Dakotah and being very upset that he changed his hair.
  • Noah experiencing his first time teaching a workshop, and being so inspired by the kids that he wants to teach more.
  • During a talk back a girl said that she didn’t want to watch because Shakespeare is boring, but then she found herself really enjoying the show.
  • All the schools that made us signs welcoming us. Especially the sign that said “Thanks Shakespeare for revealing me to me”
  • All the students who came up to us to tell us how inspired they were
  • “The Luke Crew”, as we call them, which are the students who have seen Luke each year through high school. Especially the one who said that Luke was the reason he got into acting.
  • All the workshops
  • Holding a baby goat in a gas station
  • Every girl wanting Sarah’s cool hair
  • Autographing backpacks, shoes, and arms. (I’m sorry to the moms about that)
  • Working with my fabulous tour mates
  • Working with Sara Bruner. (Enough said)
  • Seeing  all that this state has to offer
  • Performing “Macbeth”
  • Being Lady Macbeth!
  • And lastly, and maybe most importantly, feeling the energy in the room when we know that a group of high school kids are actually engaged in Shakespeare. It’s a wonderful feeling and one that proves that this tour makes a difference.

Well, that’s it for me! It’s been a great ride! Thank you to the schools, the teachers, and the kids that make my job so wonderful!
–Veronica Von Tobel



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Behind the Scenes Video: the making of the tours!

March 15th, 2012

Enjoy an incredible glimpse into the making of our tours- Shakespearience and Idaho Theater for Youth.  It takes a village and they are talented!

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Thanks to all involved- especially Lori Regan,  Jessamine Jones and Kiely Prouty.

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"The service and loyalty I owe, in doing it, pays itself." Macbeth I.iv

January 27th, 2012

Rules of the Road: We’ve just finished the second full official day of touring, and I thought I’d take a moment to give you a glimpse of what being on the road means. These are our “rules” by that, I mean, these are things that make all of our lives a lot easier on the road, both as an acting company and as friends traveling together. So, in no particular order, other than the first rule is the most important and most often used rule:

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The Rules of Shakespearience:
  • If somebody wants a Twinkie, stop and get them a stinking Twinkie! This is a rule we have inherited and respected from the late, great Danny Peterson, who used to do this same tour some years ago. Basically, this rule is if someone says, “Hey, I’d really like to stop and get a bite to eat.” or, “Gosh I could really use a coffee.” or even, “I need to read the newest issue of Vogue RIGHT NOW!” Just oblige. Everyone will be a lot happier in the long run if everyone’s needs are met on the road.
  • No texting while driving; actually, no anything while driving other than driving. That’s why there are passengers, to help you navigate, DJ, man the walkie-talkies, call schools to let them know the roads are icy but we will be there soon, etc.
  • If you see a cologne dispenser in a road-side restroom, don’t put a quarter in there and assume to get a mini bottle out of it. It just sprays you. Right in the face, if you’re not regular trucker height. Veronica learned this the hard way. Then the rest of her van mates learned it the hard way with her.
  • Never hit the road without making sure Luke has had a coffee, and Dakotah a food (see rule 1).
  • Always lock the vehicles. Always.
  • Leaving fifteen minutes before the scheduled departure time is leaving on time.
  • Tour buddies eat together whenever possible. We try to eat together once a tour day, even when we’re not out of town. It’s a good time to talk about the show and how things are going.
  • Minivan always leads the Penske truck, unless we’re driving back roads at night, then the Penske leads because it’s more likely to survive hitting an animal that the mini van.
  • Never snap at each other during load-in or load-outs. You’re either going to realize how silly the thing you were mad about was in five minutes, or you’ll forget about it entirely.
  • Don’t break the seal. Meaning, don’t pee until you really have to. If you break that seal too early, you’ll just have to go every thirty minutes, and on a ten hour drive, that’s just rough.
  • If you fall asleep in the minivan at anytime, you must be Von Tobled (meaning Veronica will take a picture of you sleeping and immediately post it to Facebook).
  • You must get the free, fresh baked cookies from the Comfort Inn promptly at 8pm each evening. If you do not, you are a fool.
  • BYOP. (Bring your own pillow).
  • Take up knitting. Yeah. Knitting. Only one tour member this year has yet to learn, give me two hours and this will be remedied.
  • Bring a swimsuit.
  • Never trust Google maps implicitly. The successful tour uses Google maps, an Atlas and, this year, a GPS.
  • If you can’t find something… did you check your ditty bag? (It’s a bag that hangs with your costume that holds small costume items, glasses, phone props, bracelets, etc.)
  • If you get to drive the van in town, you drop off the dry cleaning.
  • Wash your costume regularly. No one wants to be the smelly kid on tour.
  • Always bring your road kit, in-town show or out. Actor’s road kit includes: Water, Ricola. Emergen-C, AirBorne, Water, Tums, Chapstick, hand sanitizer, ThroatCoat Tea, IBProfen and water.
  • In Pocatello, you go to Buddy’s and you get a salad. In Sandpoint, you go to Eichardts and get anything (or everything) and you always take the suggestions of the locals. Always. (Especially if that suggestion is, “You really shouldn’t take that road at night.”)

-SG

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Shakespearience Macbeth Week 2 Video

January 23rd, 2012

Shakespearie

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nce cast of Macbeth shares their thoughts on week 2 of rehearsal.

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Macbeth: Blood, Sweat, and Fears

January 18th, 2012

We are now,

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officially in full swing of rehearsals for Shakespearience's Macbeth. “Why, Whatever is this Shakespearience of which you speak?” one may ask, if they spoke in a very formal manner. Well, I could tell you, but it's a rather lengthy explanation, and it turns out someone has already done all of that for me. Basically, it's a bunch of really cool organizations (click here to check out the list of awesome supporters) stepping in to make sure everyone who would usually never get to see Shakespeare, gets to see some Shakespeare! Shakespearience is wonderful for a multitude of reasons, but mostly, right now… Guess who's got two thumbs and isn't waiting tables? This girl! That's right friends, I'm making money doing what I love more than anything in the world, and things are starting to look up.

I thought I'd devote a little time to break down exactly what being in rehearsals means. It's only recently become apparent to me exactly how foreign the theater world is to those of you who have “real people jobs” (meaning that you either have an office/cubicle, you spend a large portion of the day looking at the computer or you work from 9a-5p (or more, in some cases, days a week). Similarly, how foreign having a real person job would be to me.

In case you didn't follow the link above, this particular production is a condensed version of Macbeth which is focused on making the play accessible for high school audiences (more on that later). The day-in-the-life picture of the rehearsal process looks something like this:

Get up early. Warm up my body. Coffee. Not too much. I'm thankful every day for the espresso machine my sister and brother-in-law gave me for my graduation. It's saved me a lot of money on early tour mornings, and likely a few heart palpitations. Go to rehearsal around 8:10. We're very lucky, it's about a seven minute walk to the space, and taken briskly is an excellent warm up. Set up. Set up involves putting coffee on in the office (where the admins have real people jobs and work in a theater! Amazing!) Getting out weapons and putting the set together… er… what we have of the set so far. This year it's two ladders, a ten foot tall rolling staircase, and three large flats to hide us when we're not onstage. Then; rehearsing.

Need more coffee perhaps....

Right. What does that mean? Our main job as actors (not to mentions the director, set designers, sound designers, costume designers, etc.) is to tell a story. To tell a story that's over four hundred years old in a way that's very clear to understand to you, the audience. As actors, we know our lines and mostly know what they mean (certainly will by the time we open) So the main job of rehearsal is to make things clear. We run scenes, work scenes to figure out how a certain moment can be more clear, or more specific, figure out how to indicate the passage of time from one scene to the next without saying, “Meanwhile, back at the Macduff's house…”. Our job is to let you know what's going on so you can sit back and enjoy the story, because that's really what this is all about; the story.

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So. We rehearse for six hours, with two ten minute breaks and one twenty minute break. We work on the timing of our entrances. Dissecting exactly what we're saying, working different moves with umbrellas (lots of umbrellas in this world of Macbeth), tracking where props go, figuring out who will be backstage to hit a sound cue, etc.

At the ready.

We go on like this for three weeks, which never feels like enough time, but we always pull through. This year, however, we missed the first three days because designers were brought in from out of town, our fight choreographer couldn't make it yet, etc.

So. That's pretty much rehearsal life. It goes by pretty quick, and we'll be on the road performing in one week from today, which is an entirely different job and thereby, will have an entirely different blog post.

Umbrellas!

And I suppose I owe you an explanation for the not-so-positive-sounding-post-title.

Blood: Rehearsal does not come without muscle soreness or bruising. My legs are coated in bruises from different fights (let it be noted that I may be the only one, as I bruise much like a well ripened peach). I did also gash my thumb open on a particularly ornery umbrella.

Sweat: Aside from the menial “work-out” I've been doing in the morning, Shakespearience shows are marathon acting. If you have anytime backstage, you are not resting, you are doing a quick change, running a sound cue and helping someone else with a quick change. Usually all within fifteen seconds.

Fears: Actors are sensitive. It really is true. We put ourselves into a job that opens us up for criticism and rejection from every angle, Also, considering we’ll be performing for a high school audience, usually around 8am, it sometimes can seem like an uphill battle. Seriously, do you remember being ready to be thoroughly entertained by an assembly at 8am when you were in high school? It's nerve wracking and sometimes devastating, but it is so entirely and absolutely rewarding.

-SG

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"I have begun to plant thee…" Duncan, 1.4

January 9th, 2012

The first we

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ek of rehearsals have come to a close and things have started to take shape. This is a part of the process where the production is full of possibility and mystery and potential. It’s a little crazy to think we only have two more full weeks of rehearsing left before out first preview performance, but our fights are choreographed, and the first quarter of the show is roughly blocked out and in all of our little actor bodies and minds. I think most of us wish we could go back to rehearsal tomorrow instead of having a day off, but breaks are good for you, even if you don’t want to take one, right?

As we leave our first week of rehearsal on simmer, we’ll leave you with a few more photos and a little end of the week video.


Noah and Dakotah, lookin' fierce from fightin'? Check!

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Director and Assistant Director/Stage Management playing with a strange object? Check!



Rolling stairs? Check!


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Charles Fee on The City Club of Cleveland

January 6th, 2012

Download the podcast from the live broadcast show from January 6th by clicking here.

January 6, 2012 featuring Charles Fee, Producing Artistic Director, Great Lakes Shakespeare Festival.

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Charles Fee, of the Great Lakes Shakespeare Festival, discusses the rewards and challenges of simultaneously serving as Producing Artistic Director for three professional theater companies in three different states.

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